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Welcome /  Blog /  2019-06-doc5 A Standing International Forum of Commercial Courts (SIFoCC)

2019-06-doc5 A Standing International Forum of Commercial Courts (SIFoCC)

Since a few years a Standing International Forum of Commercial Courts (SIFoCC) is active. Membership of SIFoCC involves access to a unique international network of judges to share knowledge and expertise, to discuss common problems and identify and prepare for major future change and development.
Membership is open to jurisdictions with an identifiable commercial court or with courts handling commercial disputes. The judiciary of the country becomes the member, rather than any individual judge. Opportunities via membership include the establishment of a sustainable peer-to-peer relationships at judicial level, sharing best practice and support in its wider application, and assistance in building capacity. Through these activities SIFoCC wants to serve better all in the judicial industry: users, markets and other courts, to join forces to make a stronger contribution to the rule of law than commercial courts can do separately, and, ultimately, contribute to stability and prosperity worldwide.
The present membership of SIFoCC include commercial courts in New York, Delaware, Australia, Singapore, Ireland, and London (England & Wales), Sctland and Northern Ireland, Canada and New Zealand. SIFoCC is building its global network by having included courts from the Gulf States (Dubai, Qatar, Abu Dhabi and Bahrain), Hong Kong. Courts from Europe (Hamburg and the English-language Netherlands Coomerical Court) were included, as were offshore jurisdictions (e.g. Bermuda, Eastern Caribbean, The Cayman Islands).
SIFoCC agreed to progress the following areas of work in the first instance (i) a multilateral memorandum on current best means of enforcement of commercial judgments between members, (ii) a working party on how best practice might be identified and litigation made more efficient, (iii) a structure for judges of the commercial court of a number of developing countries to be able to spend short periods of time together as observers in the commercial court of another SIFoCC country, and (iv) practical arrangements for liaison with arbitral bodies to identify and resolve areas of difficulty.

Where only 'courts' can become a member it is hoped that individual judges can easily share experiences and be involved in the development of a programme to can directly tackle their needs. As said many times, problems emerging in a global economy need global solutions; courts are taking steps in a right direction and judges as indivicuals should be involved along the way. More information, see https://www.sifocc.org.